Autism research takes a close look at DNA and makes some discoveries

Autism research takes a close look at DNA and makes some discoveries

Doctors have made tremendous progress over the past 40 or so years in diagnosing autism, but there are still so many questions. Questions include, how does the disorder occur? Why does this happen? Researchers are now studying DNA closely and making discoveries. Israel Winston, 13, has a beautiful face and a sweet smile. He is also autistic. He was diagnosed at the age of 4 after his father, Rico Winston, noticed symptoms. didn’t look at you. And, his speech, he started saying ‘I love you’ and then it stopped,” Rico Winston said. “He’s come a long way. He was non-verbal until about age 5.” Autism Research Study “SPARK is the largest genetic study in autism,” said Ericka Wodka, PhD, ABPP-CN, Clinical Director of the Centers for Autism and Related Disorders. There are several clinical sites across the country, of which Kennedy Krieger is one. “The goal is to help understand the why of autism – why people are autistic, why the spectrum is so wide and variable. The idea is just to be able to answer more questions,” Wodka said. Wodka said researchers have made a breakthrough in identifying a group of previously overlooked genes that are linked to mild symptoms of autism.” These moderate-risk genes are important because they don’t always lead to autism. Some people have it and they don’t end up getting diagnosed with autism, and some people do,” Wodka said. “These moderate-risk genes are also much less likely to cause severe developmental delays.” Wodka said the finding came as no surprise to the researchers. “I think we know these things are out there. We have to participate in finding them,” Wodka said. Researchers need a more diverse group of people and spreading the word about research has become Rico Winston’s calling.” There’s a lot of stigma around (autism), especially in African American and Black communities. , and I learned that awareness is essential,” he said. “We are doing our part to create this awareness because without research, where will we be in the future?” Any American with autism is eligible to participate in the SPARK study from home. Participants answer a few questions on a computer, spit into a tube, and mail the sample.

Doctors have made tremendous progress over the past 40 or so years in diagnosing autism, but there are still so many questions.

Questions include, how does the disorder occur? Why does this happen?

Researchers are now studying DNA closely and making discoveries.

Israel Winston, 13, has a beautiful face and a sweet smile. He is also autistic. He was diagnosed at the age of 4 after his father, Rico Winston, noticed symptoms.

“Just a behavior – whether it’s rocking, having no eye contact (or) engaging in conversation, or when people call his name, he doesn’t look at you. And , his speech, he started talking, ‘I love you,’ and then it stopped,” Rico Winston said. “He’s come a long way. He was non-verbal until he was about 5 years old.”

The Winstons are just one of hundreds of families at the Kennedy Krieger Institute’s Center for Autism and Related Disorders, and among 43,000 Americans, to participate in the Simons Powering Autism Research study.

“SPARK is the largest genetic study in autism,” said Ericka Wodka, PhD, ABPP-CN, clinical director of the Centers for Autism and Related Disorders.

There are several clinical sites across the country, of which Kennedy Krieger is one.

“The goal is to help understand the why of autism — why people have autism, why the spectrum is so broad and variable. The idea is just to be able to answer more questions,” Wodka said.

Wodka said researchers have made a breakthrough in identifying a group of previously overlooked genes that are linked to mild autism symptoms.

“These moderate-risk genes are important because they don’t always lead to autism. Some people have them and don’t end up being diagnosed with autism, and some people do,” Wodka said. “These moderate-risk genes are also much less likely to come with problems like severe developmental delays.”

Wodka said the finding came as no surprise to the researchers.

“I think we know those things are out there. We need a lot of people to participate to find them,” Wodka said.

Researchers need a more diverse group of people, and spreading research has become Rico Winston’s calling.

“There’s a lot of stigma around (autism), especially in African American and black communities, and I’ve learned that awareness is a must,” he said. “We are doing our part to create this awareness because without the research, where will we be in the future?”

Any American with autism is eligible to participate in the SPARK study from home. Participants answer a few questions on a computer, spit into a tube, and mail the sample.

#Autism #research #takes #close #DNA #discoveries

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